Fujiwara Kanefusa FKM Series Kitchen Knivessearch

Fujiwara Kanefusa FKM Series Kitchen Knives

Fujiwara Kanefusa FKM Series Kitchen Knives

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really expensive for aus8
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The Tojiro DP 8” gyuto is the same price, and it’s VG-10.
fazalmajid
I'm happy with my Tojiro petty and bread knife, but have already gotten the gifts I was looking for back when I made that comment
In same price range though, i just happened across a BD1N 8" from a company called Nexus on Amazon, I'm curious about that, but I'm more into the Japanese style handles for my own chef knives That, and it looks more like a rocker then a push cut profile, but maybe this will help someone else :)
Hey guys sorry for the long post, just thought I'd weigh in here with some insight on this line. I've been using the 210mm gyuto (the one offered here) in restaurant kitchens for about three years now.
I love this knife, and I don't really have anything bad to say about it. It's my go to knife for during dinner service. It's shorter length compared to the 240 mm I use during prep means it's not getting in my way during service. And as long as you maintain it properly it will stay razor sharp for quite awhile.
While I do love these knives they may not be for everyone and there are a few things you should know before purchasing.
First they are not symmetrically ground, meaning the two sides of the knife are sharpened at different angles. This allows the knife to slice things thinner, but left handed users will notice the knife steering because it's designed for righties. (Korin has a great sharpening YouTube channel that covers all types of knives including asymmetrical grinds).
Second they are designed to be used with a proper pinch grip. Meaning you hold the knife by pinching the blade with your thumb and pointer finger then just loosely wrap you remaining fingers around the handle. People complaining about the handles being to short are likely using a hammer grip which gives you less control over the knife and should never be used anyway.
Third these are Japanese steel and are significantly harder than European knives. DO NOT USE A HONING STEEL ON THESE KNIVES. They are used to realign the microscopic teeth on softer steel knives between sharpening. This steel is more brittle and a honing steel will just damage them. Maintain your edge preferably with a few passes over a high grit stone, but ceramic or diamond sharpening rods work as well (I use a ceramic rod at work because I can't break out the stones during service).
Finally the blade shape is not very conductive to rock chopping. It's designed for push/pull cutting. Also it'd not a very tall knife so users with larger hands may find their knuckles hitting the board.
If those few caveats don't bother you then this is a great knife and I highly recommend it.
ChefConfit
A very well thought out and thorough review, I like seeing that 👍
I have to question one thing though.... I know many Japanese kitchen knives should not be used with a traditional steel due to their hardness, but... Does Aus-8 at 57-58 rockwell really fit that category?
It doesn't matter to me all that much, I own a ceramic rod, not a steel (since most of mine are above 60hrc), I'm just purely curious. Where does the cutoff for steeling lie?
Kavik
So the reason ceramic and diamond hones work while traditional honing steels damage japanese knives is because they are harder than the steel in the knife while honing rod steel is softer than the steel used in most Japanese knives. Typically honing steels are 65 hrc so that would be were I draw the line.
Still cheaper to buy from chefknivestogo.com
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Shipping and taxes, maybe?
Free fast shipping
The handles are too short. Especially on the Gyuto. I cannot get all four fingers on the handle.
Memoryerror
That's not how most kitchen knives are designed to be held, look up the pinch grip
Why no shipping to Israel?
Made and manufactured in Japan?
rdodev
Yes
I’m torn between this and Kanetsugu Saiun. Do you guys think the latter is better than the former? I was thinking if I should wait for Massdrop to restart the drop on Kanetsugu Saiun or I should go ahead with this. I just dabble into the world of cooking and therefore my knowledge of knives is extremely limited.
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Wow thanks for the awesome information! I’ll stick to the gyuto for now :)
Bakaas
You’re welcome, and if you have any other questions just ask away I’ll try to answer them to my best ability.
Hi. i saw your FAQ. mentioned that you can ship to singapore. But the checkout didnt allow. Can some one help?
caiwj22
That list is for countries that Massdrop can ship knives to, but does not mean that every drop will ship to every country.
Geographical restriction on sale, not shipping restriction.
Ugh shipping on 22nd? So much for Xmas gifts for my coworkers.
if there's a sujihiki option I would be definitely in.
Add more gyutos
Why is Massdrop shipping SOOOO SLOOOOWWWWW?
Only in the MD world do you wait a month for a drop to close, then get a shipping notice and a short 8 days later your package arrives. 8 day shipping within the USA, who knew such a service still existed.
Next time, please include the 24cm Gyuto, I'd love to pick one of those up and replace my thrift store chef's knife. I am grabbing the Petty and Santoku this time around. Look forward to having some decent knives soon.
I got the 210mm Gyuto and the Santoku (latter for a friend) in the last drop. Great knives! The out of the box sharpness is great. It's about as sharp as my amateurishly sharpened and polished Zwilling santoku. I bet if I touch up the Fujiwara on some high grit stone and then take it to a loaded strop it will outdo the Zwilling.
Fit and finish feels fine, maybe a bit sharp on the spine and the choil. If you like to pinch grip you will probably want to use some sandpaper there.
I wish this drop would have given the option of getting the 240mm Gyuto though!
The count is wrong. 36 * 3 is not equal to 136.
I know, I know my math. kidding.
This is a nice price on what by nearly all accounts is quite a good series of basic Japanese stainless steel knives. I just wish there were a few more options available.
There are almost 20 different models available in the FKM range, and personally I would have found it hard to resist if one of the larger 240mm or 270mm (9.5 or 10.5 inch) Gyutos or Sujihikis had been available at a similar discount.
THese FKM knives by Fujiwara are great starter knives. The Santoku they have here was one of my first quality knife purchases almost 10 years ago. I have moved on to more higher end knives, but I still use this knife regularly for jobs I dont quite want to subject my nicer blades to. Its edge retention isnt the best, but I used to get about a month of daily use before it would really show it needed a sharpening.
Fit and finish is great for what you are paying. Its a sturdy, well balanced, comfortable knife. My only complaint is that the edge retention on the steel could be a bit better. That said, this was a great knife to learn how to sharpen with Japanese water stones.
I can definitely recommend these knives.
Is it a 70/30 edge on the entire line?
Lalus
Most likely, but don't overthink it
Stupid question, are these forged or stamped?
alive689
If you've read Chad Ward's An Edge in the Kitchen, this is the type of knife referred to as 'machined'. It's stock removal, as with nearly everything else folks typically run into. Not sure exactly what your standard or mental image is for forged.
sc_fd
All knives are stock removal, both stamped and forged (these knives are forged). Stamped knives are stamped out of a sheet/roll of steel into a near final shape, then any finer details such as blade profile, etc is machined, hence stock removal. Forged knives are forged into near their final shape under likely hydraulic hammers from billet, then the final details are machined in, also stock removal. Both styles are then usually partially sharpened, heat treated, then finished with handles/final sharpening/polishing and boxed up for shipping.
Nice pricing, a good starter Japanese knife
I just bought Fostex T-X0. The gf needs a new chef knife and this seems like a good starter for quality knives. Massdrop needs to stop taking my money lol
Just received my 7-inch Santoku and the knife is great. Feels good in hand and is plenty sharp out of the box.
One thing to note, the knife (at least mine) comes with a traditional Japanese chisel grind for right-handed use. I didn't see it in the description but was thinking that might be the case. This means the cutting edge is sharpened more on the right side (see the attached picture). It doesn't bother me, since I'm right-handed, but I figured some folks would like to know.
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Solecs
I'm pretty sure, being a stainless steel knife, that this isn't a true traditional Japanese chisel grind, but still double-edged grind with a 70-30 ratio. This means unless your cutting technique is absolutely horrible, you will be able to cut normally if you're right-handed. Thanks for the heads up for those who may buy this as their first Japanese knife.
gardey
Good point. Might have been better to say standard Japanese grind since these aren't technically traditional Japanese knives anyway.
Also, to follow up after some time using the knife, I do find that it is a bit on the thick side. I have a thinner Tojiro gyuto that slices better but has slightly worse fit/finish and is less comfortable to hold compared to the Kanefusa. I'd say the Kanefusa is still a great buy for a first knife in this style though since it doesn't need to be babied and beats most anything you'd find at a big box store.
Months have past MD whats happening with knife shipping ? I get lot of export from UK, US and China... With DHL, UPS and TNT, plus USPS stop lying to our face about shipping, hear it all... Close blade, open blade etc ... Thats bullshit ! I can order any kitchen knife from amazon, also a tactical one, wtf is wrong with you MD, this issue have been addressed so many times ! Inch sizes folded or not, protected in shipping etc, you're full of shit ! MassShit would be closer to it tbh ...
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VG-10 is a plague, it is beyond me how it's become basically ubiquitous in the kitchen knife world when there are so many better stainless steels. If I had to go with an inexpensive stainless knife I'd take AUS-8 over VG-10 any day.
SickMeds
Love it.
If it is Japanese why does teh box say made in china?
EndMe
What if the box was made in China?
This is the Fujiwara Kanefusa FKM line which uses AUS-8 steel. It's an okay stainless steel; it's certainly better than something like X50CrMoV15 found in a Wusthof and will hold an edge longer despite being at the same hardness. edit: To clarify it's a good steel at 57-58 HRC. Different steels like VG-10 can get much harder, but also offer a different experience that doesn't make for a good comparison.
Overall Fujiwara knives are usually a good value for the price with good fit and finish (grinds, polish, etc.). JapaneseChefsKnife.com sells the entire line but the Massdrop prices are about $10 less per knife without shipping, which is a standard $7 on JCK so $17 less overall if buying just one.
Here's the entire line on JCK: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/FKMSeries.html#FKM Same thing on ChefKnivesToGo which has reviews for each knife: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/fufkmse.html
I would recommend any of these for someone looking for quality and performance similar to, if not better than, a Wusthof or Zwilling, but with a Japanese profile.
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Do you have a single bevel knife like an usuba? Its make it a lot easier, if not even possible.
FriedShoe
f***. something else i need to buy. ;_;
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