Kent Wang Ebony Chopsticks (6 Pairs)search

Kent Wang Ebony Chopsticks (6 Pairs)

Kent Wang Ebony Chopsticks (6 Pairs)

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Just received mine, and while they feel good in the hand, 5 of them are distinctly warped and curve to one side. You can see the how big the difference can be in the top photo. In the 2nd photo it's the 5 on the left, all curving to the left. Will email sales@kentwang.com to see if they can help out, since the straight ones feel great.
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Just got mine, niiiice :) Not as straight as a pool cue but I think I can live with that...
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I'm disappointed by the quality control aspect of this drop. AND this is one of my first drop too.
I ordered 6 pairs of chopsticks (12pcs) from " Kent Wang Ebony Chopsticks (6 Pairs)" and out of the 12 pcs, 3 of them had quality issue (1 has two long crack, 2 other has small chip; all at the top/square part of the chopsticks).
Haven't you guys seen the fork?! 😁
Couldn't use these to eat if you paid me, but I can tell you they would make excellent drink stirrers ;- )
If you are into looks, these are killer. However, the cheap ones they give you at restaurants will perform exactly the same. Laquer coated ones last longer. They are my favorite. Avoid metal ones unless they are flattened. I hope this helped anyone buying chopsticks.
SeagullLikesFries
True. Rounded metal ones are more slippery and it's harder to grab things like noodles. However, they seem to be more commonly sold and used (in korean markets) than the flattened ones.
If you're good with chopsticks, it won't really matter.
Also, cheaper ones will be like a $1 a pair, so I would only buy these if you really want that upscale look and you eat with chopsticks a lot.
Carved by hand. Can't say that's high on my list of dream jobs.
Never been a fan of Chinese-style chopsticks. Maybe I just need to improve my technique, but Japanese ones are a lot easier to use, imo. I even prefer stainless steel Korean ones to fat-tipped ones like these.
shimage
stainless steel ones are too slippery and heavy for my taste.
dahoo
Never had a problem with weight, but yes, they are typically pretty slippery. I'd still take them over Chinese ones, though.
I've seen some folks complain about these ( @tikkytak and @xraymind recently for example ). I ordered some and would be more than happy to give an unbiased take on them, and I'll even try to swing by a local asian grocery here in Charleston (we have a big one called H&L for anyone around these parts looking for one) and pick up some of the inexpensive ones to compare these @KentWang ones against.
Utterly ridiculous, Staining? Bending? Expensive? "Shutup and take my money" is a meme not a life philosophy. Go to an asian grocery and pick up similar chopsticks for under $5. Mine are over 5 years old and always go in the dishwasher. Out of all the ridiculous hipster crap they have in here I had to comment on this one as I know there is a better alternative.
tikkytak
Yea, the local Daiso(Japanese 100 Yen store) here in California sells a pack of 3 pairs for $1.50.
How do I find the Japanese version (shorter, more pointed tips)?>
bobkoure
These are beautiful, simple, elegant and inexpensive.
@KentWang couple of my chopsticks started to bent which makes them very difficult to pick up food. is there any way to straighten them or get them replaced?
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would being soaked in water for a prolonged period of time cause this as well since theres no lacquer finish?
DocZZZ
Soaking in water by itself shouldn't be a problem, but if you also have something heavy pressing on the chopsticks, that could cause warping. For example the chopsticks are at the bottom of your sink and you have heavy pots pressing down on top of them. This is true of all wooden utensils.
The photos can't properly convey how nice these chopsticks feel. The quality is just absurdly good and they're probably worth twice the asking price.
How do we take care of these to make sure they last? Do we need to treat them with wood oil and if so how often? Thanks!
reptile18
and is normal extra strength dish detergent going to be too harsh? should we use a more sensitive dish soap to clean these?
reptile18
I wouldn't worry about any of that. Maybe some wood oil every year, if you like doing that kind of thing. I personally do no maintenance. My parents have ebony chopsticks over 30 years old that they've done no maintenance on and still look great.
So random... chopsticks? Stick to sunglasses lol
@KentWang crazy question, but small communities like this tend to give opportunities like this to ask crazy questions directly to the people behind products sometimes which I dig. I watched the video Benu had on their site (link at bottom of this post) and noticed they had several different sets of chopsticks in use, including yours. Do you by any chance know why they choose different sticks for different uses/dishes? Wondering if there are advantages/disadvantages to using certain ones, or if they change the experience of certain dishes.
https://vimeo.com/261390865
KennethAndrews
Thanks for posting this great video. I haven't seen it before.
0:26—Flat metal chopsticks, may be Korean style, or may just be made to match the spoon. I find these hard to use and they give my hand cramps, though if you're Korean and have been using these for years, you're probably used to it.
2:02—Extra size cooking chopsticks, Japanese style, tapering to a point. They're unusually long and thick, for grasping dumplings from a large cooking vessel, but the wood looks pretty utilitarian.
2:35—My chopsticks! The best style for eating with.
BTW, the soundtrack is the theme from the film "In The Mood For Love", my favorite Chinese film.
KentWang
I thank you very much for the in depth answer! I also have not had the best experience with metal chopsticks. I appreciate the look but I find them cumbersome and am not fond of the way they feel when they occasionally bump up against my teeth (which is odd because as an American I've grown up completely with metal utensils and didn't start using chopsticks until the last 10 years of my life!).
I also felt that the other wooden style looked..."utilitarian." A very diplomatic description! ;)
Your chopsticks are lovely, and I look very much forward to getting a set, as well as hopefully those amazing looking horn chopstick rests (I do hope they come back soon!).
And lastly I thank you for adding a new movie to my movie queue. And it even has a Criterion edition out there! Nice addition to my collection!
This is probably the white dude in me talking, but these chopsticks look like the exact opposite of what I'd want. Round up top for comfort of holding, and square at the bottom to more easily pick things up.
Telanis
You can try holding them backwards
Telanis
I once owned a cheap pair of bamboo chopsticks that had round tips and square ends, except that the square portion of the chopsticks had a quarter-turn twist. The square ends actually DO help you keep hold of them because they give an edge to grip against. I find it helps me to maneuver the sticks easier when picking up heavier or more cumbersome pieces of food versus round chopsticks.
My only concern with these chopsticks is that I would prefer a thinner tip, but at this price I am willing to try these out and see if my preference is unwarranted.
11 nice chopsticks arrived, along with 1 very warped one. WTF? I paid for 6 pairs of _usable_ chopsticks, not 5 pairs and a clown set.
Between long delays, increasing amounts of cheesy crap, prices that aren't really saving much, and poor quality, I think that Massdrop has lost its way. Wasn't this supposed to be a place for community members to band together to save money by buying in bulk? Now it's just a Sharper Image for Millennials. I can do better on Aliexpress or Banggood.
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Thanks, Kent! Good to know that you stand by your product and take the time to respond personally. That sort of professionalism is becoming uncommon, I fear. I retract my complaint.
I'll send you an email with my address and a photo of the offending chopstick (I only need half a pair) so you can see what went wrong (for QC purposes).
chasmun
Replacement pair arrived. Thank you much! Appreciate the honest and professional service. And the chopsticks are lovely.
Just got mine in. Heads up to anyone else who ordered them, when I gave them a quick hand wash with some soapy water, I saw a dark brown residue on my sponge. Maybe it was a bit of the finish or something. Make sure you give them a good washing before using them. Probably safe to eat, but better safe than sorry, right?
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techwiz
Sorry, I'm just now seeing your comment—Massdrop doesn't send us notifications when comments are posted :(
We don't apply any finish, varnish, paint, oil, or any other substance, but the wood does have natural pigments that may come off the first few times you use them. The pigments are natural, inherent to the ebony, and are safe for consumption, and won't stain.
KentWang
Awesome, thanks for clearing that up.
" A slow-growing tropical wood ", so is this a sustainable product or not? I stopped right there and couldn't make a decision. Oh well... back to researching one more item.
Hunt
According to their website: http://www.kentwang.com/misc/dinnerware/ebony-chopsticks.html
"Sustainably harvested ebony. Ebony is a slow-growing, tropical wood with a natural black color. One of the densest woods, it sinks in water."
The way that hand holds chopsticks is SOOOOO wrong.
bulaohu
I know, I saw that and immediately thought "That person has never actually eaten with chopsticks... at least, not successfully." I learned to use chopsticks working at a Japanese steakhouse, which oddly enough was owned by a Vietnamese man. I always watched he and his son eat and they always held the chopsticks at the furthest end of the sticks. I copied them and use the same technique, which works extremely well for me.
I have often wondered if all Asian cultures hold the chopsticks at the far end or if some choke up on them a little bit (admittedly because so many pictures show people holding chopsticks at about 75% of the distance to the end). Just looking at this picture, though, you can simply apply common sense and know that the laws of physics would be working against you holding any significant amount of food long enough to put it in your mouth.
Funny product shot- the person holding the chopsticks is doing it in the common Western way-too-close-to-the-pointy-end fashion :)
RockyMountains
Hah, I was wondering about that myself.
I was thinking, "They make chopsticks, so surely they would know how to hold them correctly. Has everyone I know been holding our chopsticks wrong all this time?"
So just curious... but mind sharing where you source your ebony wood from?
Looking forward to these as a gift. Do you have a recommendation for accompanying holders that would be suitable as part of the gift? I noticed that the horn ones on your website are sold out.
Isuisweis
We're looking to restock our horn chopstick holders in early 2018.
Don't worry about matching holders to ebony chopsticks. You can use practically anything: porcelain, wood, stone.
KentWang
Sounds good. Thanks for the update!
Um... these are not safe to eat with, folks. Reusable, hand-washed, unfinished wood is a bacteria farm.
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I guess..? I mean, if I'm eating salmonella in my food, I already done goofed, right? Does it matter whether I use unfinished wood chopsticks or a designer unobtanium spork at that point?
Dermott
The idea of comparing the wood used in those studies to these chopsticks is misleading, at best. Ebony is an extremely dense wood, and it contains natural oils that should serve to make it naturally hydrophobic. This would prevent diseased water from soaking into the wood as long as you don't wash them in a dishwasher, which would wash those oils away.
The same could be said about properly washed and maintained wooden cutting boards. You should always hand-wash them to keep the oils in the wood and you should oil them at least once a month to replenish those oils. I'm not sure if there is any reason to treat your chopsticks with oil, but it probably wouldn't hurt anything to do so if you are worried about food-born pathogens.
Dishwasher safe?
bbpig
As with all wooden utensils, hand wash only. The high heat of a dishwasher may cause warping over time.
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I've been personally using these chopsticks for 2 years and can attest to their longevity. My parents have ebony chopsticks that they got for their wedding 35 years ago and they're still going strong—both my parents and the chopsticks.
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Thanks. I getting these for my family. It is good to know the cost goes into the product, not the packaging.
Bit rude— he just said his parents are still going strong. Won't be in a box for a long time.
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