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Does nothing besides 720p to 1080p for a 4k@30hz TV :-(
LMAO, I've been scratching my head trying to figure out what is shipping to me, I got an alert from FedEx on Monday and today I got a notice from Massdrop.
is there a difference between this and gaming version
Is there anyway to contact the vendor through Massdrop to get the SKU or model number? Read through all of the comments up until this point and no one seems to know what exactly this and the only consensus is that it's not the newly available models.
OHHHH so that's how crime TV shows are like ENHANCE and that individual pixel suddenly turns into a 4K image of a license plate
No shopping to UK? Why? ūüėĘ
The no less than 5 different links to the Linus Tech Tips video about the latest Gaming/Cinema versions of these cables would imply that people aren't paying a ton of attention to these comments, but in usual self-vindication-on-internet fashion; I'll try my best to add to the chatter.

What you probably need to know:

1. Not snake oil (at least, not fully). Real, actively powered (via USB) digital signal processing with a processing chip, seemingly decent AA algorithms, and whatnot. True 4k? Nah. But about as good as you could manage with nice video editing software (and in realtime).

2. How good? Your mileage may vary. Important to note diminishing returns from 480p/720p/1080p sources with lower-res sources seeming to get the biggest improvements. Please watch the Linus video linked many, many times below in these comments for an important source setup caveat. (As a friendly aside: remember that when you're viewing your 4k screen from 6-8ft away, the math would support that 99% probably can't see the 1080p upscale anyway...let the tomatoes be thrown.)

3. Which one is this? Oldest one. Basically, there are the new Gaming/Cinema editions, before that was the Ultra, and the original (this one) is now referred to as the Legacy. That was a pain to figure out, but this short video by the Marseille CEO seems to support this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q--IUlJHLSQ (you can skip to about 1:25 in when he grabs the different boxes).

Verdict? Neat idea, and I certainly have the low-res library of games/movies to support such a cable; but I'll probably hold for a price reduction on either/both of the newer cables. If for no other reason than Linus Tech Tips showed side-by-side comparisons of those to a native source; and I haven't seen the improvements of this one. Given that the results of Linus' review are impressive but still relatively niche - if this one performs worse, my "eyes-to-screen-size-to-distance" ratio probably means I won't see any improvement.


Hope that helps.
Would not waste my money on this. All you need is an HDMI 2.0 cable, which you can get twice as long as this for 1/2 the price. You don't need anything else, but the rest is all marketing bs set up to make you think you need it. You don't.
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Yeah, I was skeptical when reading your post, but some may not remember that a lot of TVs that were 4K early on weren't showing it because the cables weren't up to spec for many purchasers. You're not entirely wrong by any means, but the spec is there to ensure all hardware between source to destination is in line. XBox One S requires a certain spec for instance. If you don't get the right cable, you won't see some of what you expect, assuming your TV can handle it. I have a 4K UHD HDR TV (wow that's a lot of letters). It does me no good with my current cabling between my XBox and the TV. I don't really care, but it does matter. What I'm getting at with this cable is that it won't likely help a ton more than getting your cabling up to snuff for far less money. One saving grace for this particular drop is that the shipping looks like it's free and I suppose if you only had very low-res stuff to watch it might help, but keep in mind that if you only have a 1080p TV, then it can only present 1080p fidelity.
psiclone
Ah, I think we had a bit of a disconnect and are agreeing with one another (this happens to me a lot, so it's probably my fault); but this is a great point to bring up to others looking at the cable, so I'll try to clarify here:

The actual HDMI cable is nothing special. In fact, it's pretty old, and if you have a newer spec'd 4K HDR TV (such as yourself) it's entirely possible that the cable won't even have the throughput to support all the different modes on the TV (for example: a 4K@60Hz with HDR source on a player/TV combo that supports all of this).

In a case such as this? The cable will either under-perform a cheaper cable with better throughput OR will provide exactly the same image. It can only be equal or less than, quality-wise. Never better. Period. (Looking at my previous post, I may have worded that badly and added some confusion here. If so, I apologize.) And exactly like you said: if you have a 1080p TV? This won't give you 4K or even a "like-4K" experience. It'll be capped at 1080p, and very well may not even kick in at all.

So the cable is nothing of note. The thing you're paying for is the microprocessor attached to this cable. It's an upscaler that is designed to take the place of the upscaler that may be in your source (Blu-ray/game system/etc.) or TV set. **but** it only works on lower quality stuff! This is why the cable has the caveat that you need to run your lower resolution source natively.

If you pop a DVD (480p) into your Blu-ray player, and it upscales to 1080p or 4K before sending the signal along to your TV? This cable will do very little (if it sees a 4K source, it'll do nothing; and if your 480p/720p source has already been upscaled to 1080p, this cable tacking on additional upscaling to 4K could in fact make things look worse with artifacts and over-sharpening - since you're basically doing this to the source twice in a row). Alternately, if you have a newer TV that already carries a nice upscaling processor (rare, but becoming more frequent nowadays), you will once again see very little benefit (what your TV does and what this cable does may provide near-identical benefit).

This cable is for people who have lower quality (480p/720p/etc.) sources (or gaming hardware! more on that in just a second), and a TV that doesn't handle upscaling all that well (for example: older upscalers that would look at a 480p signal and just keep duplicating pixels or stretching/distorting the image until it fills the screen). In these cases, the cable's onboard chip will do that lifting for you and bypass the potentially less effective work done by your TV.

So yes, in the case you're referring to with already feeding in nice sources to your TV? This cable will not work any wonders, and you are definitely better off just buying good cabling for less money. But for lower quality sources (say, PS3 games capped at 720p), I do think the gaming edition cable did a great job with adding the right amounts of anti-aliasing and sharpening to the image to provide a better looking image across a 4K display. (Please note: I'm basing that off of the Linus Tech Tips review, not personal experience; and that cable *is not* this cable.)

Last note is that I mentioned hardware - and this is more for the PC gamer crowd. For those with modest gaming hardware, but a nice TV/Monitor in the 1080p/4K range of resolution; they may find that they often have to drop quality settings (resolution and effects) just to get a game running at a respectable frame rate. At that point, things start to look unimpressive on their otherwise impressive display.

A cable such as this might take those lower resolution sources and make them more visually pleasing since it will add in those upscaling tricks like anti-aliasing (which is, traditionally, one of the first things a lot of gamers try shutting off to regain a bit of performance). But again, this only works if the computer is running at the game's native resolution (so if you're running your game at 1366x768, but have your desktop set to 1080p with a 1080p monitor? The cable will once again do nothing. Your desktop will also need to be set to 1366x768 before the cable's AA and sharpening kick in).

Is this as good as having the hardware to play games at your display's native 1080p/1440p/2160p resolution? No way. But it would probably still be visually perceived as better than just tacking that 720p-ish source into your high-res display without any anti-aliasing at all.

That's a whole lot of writing, but hopefully clears up some confusion for a few people still looking to buy. This is definitely a, "for some, but not others," kind of item; and as I stated before: I'm actually steering clear of this one (but may eventually buy the gaming edition for some of my older consoles and/or cinema edition for my DVDs). Just trying to make sure others have the info they might need to make their decision.
I'll be waiting for the day it ships to Germany
But which version of the mCable is this? There is like 2-3 versions and this doesn't specify anything but size
moccor
the yellow logo leads me to believe that this is their cinema version, the gaming version is red.
Is this available for someone in Canada or just U.S.?
Linus Tech Tips did a review on this, and had good things to say about it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjJzibFTaqA
So, I mean, every 4k TV out there is going to upscale lower resolution signals to 4k. Is this supposed to outperform the internal upscaler?
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Maybe zero processing on the upscaled image, but with no upscaling at all, a 1080p input to a 4k screen would appear as a box taking up 1/4 of the full area of the screen
Nnnes
Exactly! Every display that converts a digital picture to fill the available screen real estate is upscaling. The difference is in the method of filling in the interpolated pixels. It would, however, be nearly impossible to improve upon the picture quality to the point of native resolution. There are HDR technologies that may improve picture quality, but not the resolution. If the black bars around my SD videos on my HD tv might be eliminated by a bigger (upscaled) signal, but I'm not that offended by the black bars to risk the poor picture quality of a basic method of upscaling.
Ooh, this looks pretty good for $29.99. Perhaps it'll ship outside the states in the future! ^_^
Yep those earrings are uhhhh. Btw my dvdo processor from mono price ROCKS

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