SOTO Amicus Stovesearch

SOTO Amicus Stove

SOTO Amicus Stove

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(24 reviews)
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I own both the windmaster and the amicus. The wind protection comes from 1) the design of the burner and 2) the shape of the ring below the burner. Both stoves far outperform any MSR or Snowpeak stove I have ever owned including the Litemax in boil times and fuel efficiency especially in the face of wind. You will still need to find or build or carry a aluminum foil windbreak especially to light the stove. There are some excellent performance tests published by Hikin Jim at https://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com. Buy this stove. You will be happy.
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The Windmaster is manufactured out of "titanium" and with its triplex pot holder is 2.3oz according to SOTO. The Amicus is manufactured out of aluminum and weighs 2.9oz. The Amicus packs up smaller and is easier to deploy the potholders since they are attached. With the Windmaster the pot holders are detached. The fourplex has four supports under the pot and is more stable with a heavier pot. I have used the Amicus with pots up to 1 liter and 1.3 liters with no problem. I think the Windmaster had slightly faster boil times than the Amicus when I did my backyard testing. But both the Windmaster and the Amicus beat the SnowPeak Giga and the SnowPeak LiteMax. Cheers
BT47
Agreed. I've used the windmaster at altitude (4000-5000m), and it beat every other stove there in terms of boil time.
Is the igniter something that would work better in the wind as opposed to match, lighter, etc.?
scope
The igniter will be better in the wind than most matches and lighters, but it's not perfect. It usually takes me a few clicks to get it going.
scope
Sometimes. Still need a concentration of gas for the piezo to work best and in a decent breeze that can be blown away. A lighter gives bigger and more spark...piezo is convenient but they are ALL unreliable so you'll want a lighter or other sparker as a backup anyway, may as well forego the piezo on a stove and save a couple bucks, imho. Plus piezo starts to be very hit and miss above 8,000' if you do much hiking at elevation (at 10,000' you're lucky when it works).
The price for those wondering after the drop ended was $30 for the base model, $33 with the ignition, and I paid $2.75 shipping in the US. My total was $35.74.
You can sometimes find the version with the igniter for this price elsewhere with faster shipping.
JimboJones
For those wondering about delivery times: I live in the US. I ordered this on July 26. The drop ended July 28. The item shipped August 7 (10 days after the drop ended). Item was delivered August 14 (17 days after drop ended).
The 2-3 week shipping estimate seems right. Don't expect to get this ahead of schedule.
Is there a pic of the unit with the piezo electric starter all folded up? Just curious what the addition of the starter does to the fully colapsed size.
Not UL but a good performer in the class of the msr windmaster and the snow peak lite maX. Buy why four over engineere pot rests and such a huge flanged base?
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agreed about the base and four pot stands as; pros, but these are also; cons, since they are what accounts for the increase in weight.
Sloper
You've been answered, but I thought I'd add some clarity as well.
The base on this is not "huge" by any stretch. It's essentially the same diameter as the canister valve with an o-ring, so you get a good seal and can't tighten down too much. It's smaller and with less material in it than any other canister stove I've seen in person. I've never handled a BRS, but it's the only one I can think of with a potentially smaller connector.
The pot holders are well designed and provide solid support. They could remove one, but I think you'd save fewer than 5 grams, and I'd rather sacrifice 5g for the stability.
Any thoughts on this vs BSR Titanium Stove for $18, or the Etekcity for 2/$14? I know the BRS doesn't have an igniter, which is actually super handy, and the Etekcity is probably not as robust but is there any other reason to go with the the Soto? Is the actual burner any better? I haven't had any real issues with my Etekcity yet.
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JimboJones
BSR 3000 is very susceptible to wind. It has a flat exposed burner head. Also the Amicus has valve control smoother and more accessible (longer handle)
MiCro17
Thanks. I ended up pulling the trigger because of the wind resistance and valve. This really does seem like the best stove for the money from everything I've looked at. The MassDrop price isn't amazing, but it's good. I just hope it doesn't take 3-4 weeks to arrive.
Does it include any sort of carry case?
Joiiy
Just got it. It came with a branded, nylon-esque, drawstring bag. It seems to be lined to make it water resistant, and is pretty heavy duty.
Glass coffee pot had a small crack this morning and had my stove and kettle out from the beach yesterday so I decided to fire up the Soto and make some coffee. With little wind I boiled 1 liter of water I just about 5 minutes. A little over but not quite 6. Great little stove
Used the Soto windmaster yesterday at the beach with a stiff 20 mph wind. Great stove. Made breakfast tacos (eggs, bacon, sausage) and coffee. Worked great. Soto makes great gear. Do not own this model but I’m sure it’s nice too. The ignition switch in high wind makes things easy to get going and if the wind is blowing easy to get it back to cooking if the burner is blown out.
Any particular fuel work better than the others with the stove? I usually use gigapower fuel
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As I said I don't have any experience with altitude I live at 600, when I first started selling Jetboil products it seems they marketed their fuel to climbers perhaps it was the cold or the altitude or both or just marketing BS? I'll have to look back in my amazon to see the name of the oneway valve, but I have used it and mixed fuel brands with no problems but it comes with many cautions on overfilling possibilities etc..
clip
Missed that the first time had to go back and read again. I'm sure it will be fine.
Those knockoffs they mention in the description, I’ve never had one fail. And at five bucks a pop there a lot cheaper. We have four of them as well.
Zeroplanetz
I had an Etekcity that was pretty shoddy. I now have a Monoprice clone of the original Pocket Rocket that I got for like $12. The thing is very solid, and I am fairly surprised at how well the wind screen in the burner has worked. It's more than most people will ever need.
That said, I bought the Soto, and can't wait to see how it compares.
Hey everyone, Looking at this stove with maybe a Halulite cup set. Was also looking at the Jetboil Minimo set up. Which set up do you think is more efficient with fuel?
jjslypig
Definitely Jetboil because of the flux ring on the bottom. I’ve got a Jetboil Sol and 2 days ago on medium heat I was boiling 16oz at 2 minutes flat. That’s using the Soto micro regulator stove, which I’m sure is very similar to this one. I could only run it 1/2 open because the flames would come around the sides.
Massdrop FAQ says the warranty should be on the drop page. Since there is no warranty on the drop page, is it safe to assume we get none?
steine65
I don't know about an official warranty but I had one fail and Soto was quick to replace it. It was well over a year old and heavily used.
I told them that I didn't think the stove would still be under warranty, and was told this: --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- On 12/2/17, SOTO <info@sotooutdoors.com> wrote: > Dear Richard, > > Thank you for your prompt response. > Regardless of the date of the purchase, we are committed to our customer > satisfaction.  We have no problem sending you a brand new replacement stove > at no cost to you.  I will forward this to our shipping department now. > They should be able to ship you the replacement early next week. > > Have a wonderful rest of the weekend. > > > Sincerely, > > Tomo > > SOTO > info@sotooutdoors.com ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I was pleased, and impressed.
FYI, I just received mine. Haven't had a chance to test it yet, but it feels nice and sturdy (as others have noticed). It actually came early! Was supposed to ship 12/14, received it on 12/11. UPDATE: This is a great stove! + Small: Fits in Toaks 750mL mug with fuel canister, mini BIC lighter, and bandana + Sturdy: Light, but doesn't feel fragile. Easy to assemble and fold away again + Stable: 4 supports vs. Pocket Rocket's 3 supports, recessed burner protected from wind + Stealth igniter: I fill up my pot with water, put it on the stove, then turn on the gas. Stealth igniter usually starts the flame in 1-2 clicks, saving me fuel and time I have about 20 boils on this stove and a single 4 oz fuel canister, so incredibly easy to use and efficient! Granted, I don't boil more than 0.5L at a time, and I usually bring water up to just boiling and use that to rehydrate my meals (haven't tried simmering or cooking).
Have these actually shipped? Just got a delivery confirmation and I have to go to the post office to pick it up. This is the only thing I'm expecting.
Does the drop include the fuel canister?
tsanga
No.
DannyMilks
Thanks for the clarification.
With the Amicus hard-as-heck to find in Canada, I'm happy that Massdrop has it. After exchange, shipping, and possible cross border fees, Massdrop is rarely a deal for us up north, but I think this one will totally be worth it. Eagerly awaiting my new stove.
I got the Soto Windmaster here not to long ago. It is awesome! I originally wanted the Amicus stove but couldn’t wait. I’m sure this one is also good. The quality in the Soto stove I have is top notch.
Mine has arrived in Australia today. Very happy with it and how sturdy it feels given how light it is. The igniter works really well and I am glad I went for the extra few grams.
I just got mine at the office. Haven't lit it up yet around, but wow I'm super impressed. Compact, stable, well-designed just oozes strong build quality. At first I was worried at how fragile the hinges for the pot supports would be getting knocked around, but actually the joints have some sort of "suspension" that gives them a few mm of play. Really, really great design. I usually avoid piezo igniters, but this one's hidden in the stem of the stove and thus far less likely to break. Even if it does, it only adds 0.3 oz so I'll take a chance on it. Small enough that nesting it shouldn't be a problem and pretty light at sub-3.0 oz. Supremely impressed. Definitely worth the money.
Woohoo got a message that mine has posted! Waiting for the tracking to hurry up and update, wonder how long it will take to arrive overseas?
The Soto Amicus, and its older big brother the Soto Windmaster, (both made in Japan, think Lexus, Acura, Honda, and Infinity) are probably the two best canister stoves on the market today, with the MSR Pocket Rocket 2 (MSR) made by Kovea of Korea (think Kia and Hyundai) coming in at third place.
I currently own the Amicus, and highly recommend it due to the price point of around $35 to $40, as compared to $70 for the Windmaster.
It has more pot stability with four legs compared to three legged pot stand for the MSR, and it has other features not found on the MSR such as brass fittings versus aluminum, a Stealth (Piezo Electric) Igniter, a higher BTU output, and a much better built in wind screen.
Try to boil water with the MSR and the Amicus in a windy environment, and you will see what I mean.
So if you have the extra money purchase the Windmaster, but for the best value in the $30 to $40 price range, the Amicus is the way to go!
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I sure hope you aren't using one of those wind screens that fully surrounds the canister stove (those are made for alcohol stoves). If you are, congratulations you've just made a fuel air bomb with an indeterminate countdown timer. In all seriousness it's very dangerous to use any canister stove with a windscreen that surrounds the fuel canister.
ElectronicVices
Right, that's a given.
any chance of restocking the unit with the igniters??
@hikin_jim Would you recommend this over the Kovea superlite?
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shoopdeboop
Hell yes!
See my recent post, and my rankings...
1. Soto Windmaster-$70 2. Soto Amicus-$30 to $40. 3. MSR Pocket Rocket 2-$40 to $45.
I have the Omnilite and its ok. One place where it falls down is its ability to hold heat which seems to mean it needs a lot of priming when using kerosene (IMHO). I could just about make a hot cup of tea for the same amount of alcohol in my Trangia. The Omnilites thirst for priming fuel and the Trangias filthy soot has me looking once again at a propane stove.
@chugger Yes, the Amicus' pot supports raise the pot up higher above the flame than the WindMaster. At first, I was pretty suspicious that the Amicus would not be as wind proof as the WindMaster. However, after running my tests, I found that the Amicus clearly did have wind resistant properties. The Amicus ran roughly equal to a control stove of the same BTU rating in no to low wind conditions, but as soon as the wind picked up, the Amicus would boil first every time.
Now, is the Amicus exactly just as wind resistant as the WindMaster. That's a little tougher to determine. The WindMaster is a bit more powerful stove, so, unless you have some kind of specialized test set up to regulate the flow of gas, any simul-testing is not going to be an apples-to-apples comparison. With what tests I am able to do, I couldn't establish that the WindMaster is more wind resistant than the Amicus. However, my suspicion is that the WindMaster is a bit more wind resistant than the Amicus; I just don't have an appropriate test that I can run to prove or disprove it.
However, as I say, the Amicus, is clearly more wind resistant than other stoves, and I think that's the important thing here.
Note that not all ideas that stove companies have to increase wind resistance actually work. With the Primus Eta Express stove system, the designers came up with a partial windscreen, but in my testing, the benefit of said windscreen was nil. There just wasn't any appreciable difference in wind resistance with or without the windscreen. See: https://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2017/04/review-primus-eta-express-stove-system.html
HJ
Here's the review from the most reliable source for backpacking stoves: https://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2016/12/review-soto-amicus.html
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LOL
Msilverhammer
I'm telling you , that HJ guy is nothing but trouble.
how does the canister for gas work. Do you refill it or buy new canister and what kind of gas to use.
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Thanks for repl.
Well, actually butane's boiling point is 30 F, isobutane's is 11 F, and propane's is -44 F, but you've absolutely got the right idea. Butane is to be avoided in cold weather, and an isobutane/propane mix is to be preferred.
HJ
How does this stove compare to the Snow Peak Lite Max or the MSR Pocket Rocket I or II?
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" it isn't any more efficient really and the flame can still snuff out "
Well, not to take away from your experience, but that hasn't been my experience at all. I was able to turn down the flame on an Amicus to a barely there flicker, and it did not blow out even at Crystal Cove State Park which is down by the beach and is always windy.
With other stoves, not so. My PocketRocket 2 blows out if I turn it down that low and a good gust comes along.
Likewise, with respect to efficiency, I've found the Amicus to be far more fuel frugal in wind. Other stoves, not having much wind resistance, have their heat dispersed by the wind, so they have to use more fuel to compensate and are therefore less efficient.
HJ
hikin_jim
When we discuss efficiency maybe we should make distinctions. Base efficiency which I was referring to above would be measured without wind - simple consumption of gas without factors that rob heat. Maybe "real world" efficiency is more important, which would include wind and a half dozen other things. Regardless of a burner's resistance to flame out, if you operate a stove without a screen and there is a gap between flame source and point of contact, you will be losing a lot of heat. Not smart user operation but that is just my two cents on the matter. Partly based on your review and those of others reviewing the Windmaster, I did not expect the Amicus to flame out, but it certainly did a few times in open air testing. I do not operate my stoves that way on the trail, however, so it was just curiosity testing. When used with a wind screen I didn't find it to be any more or less efficient than others.
I said it with the Windmaster, and I'll say it again here: Soto makes some truly kick-ass hardware. I have one of these, and it's a great, lightweight stove. The piezo is worth the $3, IMO. Soto uses an unusual design for their piezos, and the whole thing runs up the middle of the stove and is protected, so a lot less to worry about with regards to it breaking. If you didn't get in on the Windmaster, or want a backup, jump on this!
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I have a Windmaster, not an Amicus. Does the Amicus support hold the pot slightly higher above the flame than the Windmaster support? In other words, does the Windmaster offer better protection from the wind, allowing less heat to blow away, making it slightly more efficient (in the wind) than the Amicus?
chugger
The Amicus does hold the pot a bit higher than the Windmaster.