Zojirushi Induction Heating 3-Cup Rice Cookersearch

Zojirushi Induction Heating 3-Cup Rice Cooker

Zojirushi Induction Heating 3-Cup Rice Cooker

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(5 reviews)
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Pretty sure this model is $200 with Prime right now.
Curious to know how it compares to the famous Neuro Fuzzy ZCC10? If anyone has input I'd love to hear from you :)
dleblanc
According to the zojirushi site it's basically an enhanced version - it's micom (micro computerized = fuzzy logic) plus an induction heater. If you don't want the induction heater you can probably find the fuzzy logic models cheaper.
If they can put the international option up for grabs, the rest of the world would get one.
Djohn
I support this statement so hard.
I've owned a larger version of this for 6 years, and it still performs flawlessly. oh..and it plays twinkle twinkle little star when you start a cycle!
So I have a 3 cup rice pot from Wal-mart I paid 19.99 for two years ago... It makes white, brown, sushi grade rice, and red bean rice (Korean style) with ease. Why would anyone spend nearly 10 times as much for this? I've been around Korean culture nearly all my adult life, and have never understood why so many people get all this LCD-screen-27-setting-wi-fi-enabled madness... to cook white rice. If, you're particularly picky about the consistency of your sushi rice, or you're making onigiri and really want it to stick together really well you might need a 전기밥솥 with a few different settings... they're not $180.
ohsigmachi
I've had my share of crappy rice cookers. They take longer, the rice doesn't come out as fluffy and you have to let the rice sit for an extra 10-15 minutes after the button pops up for it to actually be ready to eat. You can also schedule rice to cook so it's ready when you get home. Also in my personal experience, cheap rice cookers do really horrible with brown rice. The biggest thing for me was that in a normal rice cooker you have to cook at least 1/2 the max capacity to get decent rice, which can be too much if you're 1 person. I can cook 1/2 a cup of rice in my 3 Cup Micom Zojirushi and it comes out amazing. When I was a poor college student and my crappy $20 rice cooker broke, I knew that I didn't want to spend another 20-40 bucks on a crappy rice cooker so I saved up money to get a used Micom 3 Cup off eBay. 7+ years later, it's still going strong and I use it every single day. In the long run, spending 10x on an appliance that you use everyday and will probably be the last rice cooker you buy doesn't seem like that big of a deal.
I have this exact model off of a really good flash sale on amazon, if I remember correctly I got it for 129. This example of why I think you should buy this rice maker, happened to me a few hours ago. Okay so for every cup of white rice you put in here, you are to add two cups of water, 1:2 ratio. Well after I work a long shift and start dinner I love to do 1:1 and not realize it until its done, and its STILL edible although not really enjoyable. BUT today i realized my mistake ten minutes in, so I added water, but I also hit cancel in a panic, rather than just pausing by opening the lid. THE LIL GUY ADJUSTED THE TIME BASED ON HOW DONE THE RICE WAS BY ITSELF. This machine allows for human error, and that, my people, is why you should get this rice maker.
My husband picked up an older model of this rice cooker at Goodwill for $7.00. We love it. As I am typing, it is home cooking rice for the casserole I am preparing this evening.  
lclair
An induction cooker for $7?! Seriously?
This one always interests me. But I live in Australia and I understand that there are major voltage issues with this device outside the USA. Correct me if I am wrong. Please.
If you are already considering spending this much money on an induction rice cooker, spend a little more and get a pressure cooking one as well. We have a Cuckoo CRP-HV0667F and it's probably our best kitchen appliance by far.
aberusugi
Hadn't seen that before. Any opinion on how it compares to the CRP-G1015F ?
Not bad 38 dollar savings over the current Amazon price. I have had the Zojirushi 3L Vacuum Hot Water Dispenser for quite some time and my model is made in Japan we also have a larger version at work for the past 2 years. Not only are the Zojirushi products well thought out from a user perspective they just keep running without issue. I have had 3 rice cookers and they all begin to deteriorate with age or start to burn or make soggy rice. I have been waiting for a sale and I am glad I stumbled back to Massdrop this rice cooker is a great deal and made in Japan Zojirushi product! Also of note I have their Vacuum insulated bottle SM-SC60-AV and that thing will keep cold drinks cold all day even while sitting in a hot car on a 90 degree day.
What is the power input requirements? 120-240V?
Sharkie
Looks like it's 120 V only at there website. https://www.zojirushi.com/app/product/npgbc
Sharkie
It's ~120 only.
This thing is $150 at Bed Bath and Beyond.
EDIT: Zach set me straight. That's a different model.
StrohHund
No, that's the NS-LGC05. This is the Induction Heating variant. Both are pretty good though!
is this a Japanese made or Chinese made Zojirushi? the Chinese made ones are notoriously unreliable.
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Yes I think the Chinese are quite capable of producing high quality items, it's just not what the world is asking of them right now. We may feel that there is a healthy market for quality, but the overwhelming majority of customers are constantly proving that price supersedes all other factors. It's a real trick when companies like Bose and Apple can convince the public to spend more than the bare minimum on personal and household products. One of the reasons we have access to higher quality items like these Zojirushi rice cookers is that the Japanese have been convinced that rice cookers should cost $500 and are well worth the expense.
Annndy
I was blown away when I saw the price ranges of rice cookers in Japan, I saw a $1000+ rice cooker in one of their big box stores.
Diamond-like Carbon coated cooking vessels, ultrasonic transducer plates and whatnot. I guess it seems less extreme when you realize that there is rice that sells for $100 a Kilo in Japan.
What is the shipping costs?
Ribeye300
Depends on where you are shipping it. Cost within the US is $9.50. If you want to see the shipping costs for any drop on the site, click Join Drop and select your country. You are not required to enter any payment info to see your total cost with shipping.
Great, but not perfect
I have the larger version of this, the NP-HCC10, and while I would describe the rice it makes as perfect, I was a little disappointed in the design and construction. I want to be clear, this is an excellent cooker. I use mine constantly, many times a week, and so far it really does work perfectly. But at this high price I kinda expected perfection and I really didn't get it. I do indeed recommend the cooker but I also want to let people know where it falls short for me so they can be fully informed before dropping close to $200.
Thanks to Jbug for pointing out that some of what I wrote here about my larger model does not apply to this model. I have added to my original comments to highlight where my cooker is not or may not be identical to this.
** The following statement about the cord does not apply to this NP-GBC05! I am leaving in my original text so people can see what I wrote about the larger, more expensive model because this Massdrop offer may have some other issue that I would not know about. My reason for leaving this whole post is that Zojirushi did not live up to its reputation for perfection in my eyes. ** Cord: it is not removable (on the larger model - it is removable on the Massdrop NP-GBC05), it is short and there is nowhere to stow it when the cooker is not in use. In Japan and other rice-staple places the cooker never leaves the counter top so it's not much of an issue, but for those people who would like to put this away when they are done with it, a removable or stowable cord would be nice. Also, the cord is shorter than I would like. I guess that's what you have to do when there is no way to get the cord out of the way - make it short so it's less of a burden.
Open/Close latch: the placement of the large oval latch button (rounded rectangle on the Massdrop offer) at the middle edge of the cooker means that the most natural way to close it is to press on that button which means it won't actually stay closed when that is pressed. That means you have to press the lid closed off-center, which intuitively feels like I am asking for trouble - to bend or wear it off-center. I don't know the best answer, but I do know I don't like the placement of the latch release.
** This section is only applicable to the NP-HCC10. The Massdrop offer doesn't appear to be laid out the same way. ** Controls: asymmetric placement of cook options really bugs me in such a top-tier appliance. There are 11 options and they couldn't manage to put them in a pattern that is symmetrical. The controls in general, while simple, are somewhat counter-intuitive to me. To be specific, the order in which control buttons are to be pressed goes against what I expect. The instruction manual is also one of the most confusing and frustratingly unclear documents I have ever read. Now that I know how to use the cooker it is not a problem, but I just want more from a company with such an impeccable reputation.
Construction/Finish: 2 problems that I think are design flaws, but I can't be sure. First there is a thin gap along the top of the lid where plastic meets metal. That gap fills with dust and any other debris that might fall onto the lid. It is a very narrow gap, thinner even than a toothpick tip, but not so thin that it prevents material from falling into it and becoming virtually impossible to remove. Is that how they actually wanted it to be? I don't know, but I really dislike it. It is not a functional problem but it bothers me a lot. Second, the steam vent is held in place by a plastic tube inserted into a hole in the top of the lid. On my cooker that tube does not extend into the hole deeply enough to ever feel fully seated. The whole vent assembly wobbles, and while gravity alone keeps it in place, it just feels like it's going to come off when I open the cooker. For this kind of money I want it to fully sit deeply, snugly and unambiguously in place without giving me the feeling I got a factory flaw. ** This is my experience with my cooker, which is a different model - essentially just a larger version of this. The Massdrop offering may not suffer from either of these problems. **
I think my cooker is actually perfectly assembled according to the design, but I think the design leaves a little to be desired.
I want to be completely clear on this: my cooker works perfectly. There are no functional problems at all. But the imperfections in little design elements have led me to decide that the next time I drop this kind of money on a rice cooker, it is going to be Tiger brand. I hope this review helps someone, even if they are just uptight weirdos like me.
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Just confirmed on my 3 cup that the cord is detachable, I had totally forgotten. Still no way to store it but good to know.
ryan92084
I picked one of these up a while back. I coil the cord between uses, tuck the metal prongs of the plug into the measuring cups, and store the cord and cups inside the bowl. The cups prevent the prongs from scratching the bowl surface, and everything is right there when I pull it down to use.
I love retracting cords as long as they work, but this is fine too.
This induction cooker won’t toast the rice at the bottom of the pot but cooks very uniformly. This uniform cooker excels at small portions and porridges (like steel cut oats). I kinda miss having the toasty bottom of the white rice but brown rice comes out perfect easier. The induction cooker has couple silicone seals (non removable) and a vent which needs to be cleaned. The bowl has a Teflon like coating.
Am I missing something ? I've had a few rice cookers through the years and have never spent more than fifty bucks. What makes this one worth so much more ?
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GABA was something new to me when I got my cooker. I have always liked brown rice, but only on rare occasions. Now with the GABA setting, brown rice is so much more enjoyable and easy to make that my brown rice consumption has tripled, which is probably better for my health too.
michaelmpk
Zojirushi has a page that explains the unique purpose for this style of rice cooker - https://www.zojirushi.com/grains/nphcc10.html. As I said in an earlier reply, it is certainly possible and even reasonable to make rice in a less expensive cooker, but this model will do it a little better and a lot easier, all while being a very nicely made, elegant and somewhat luxurious home product. I'm not denying that part of the price in a model like this is certainly appearance and brand. It's probably possible to get a cooker that is functionally similar for closer to $100.
i would like to know the voltage also. 110v only or 110-230v?
Yukita
Based on the manual (pg 25), it is 120V 60Hz only.
How long does it take to cook a cup or two of rice with this? My current Zojirushi takes an hour no matter the size.
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deltron
It's always starts at about 55 minutes because it lets the rice soak before boiling it, regardless of how much rice is in the pot. I find in practice that 1 "go" cup (the Japanese measure of rice, about 80% the size of a US cup) takes about 50 minutes and 3 "cups" take about 1 hour. The change in time is probable just the difference in how long it takes to boil that much water.
deltron
3 days
There are TWO kinds of Zojirushi products. Ones made in Japan and ones made in China. I hope these are the made in Japan version. The quality control of the Chinese made Zojirushi products is questionable. Although they are supposed to be made exactly the same, many consumers feel that the Zojirushi products made in China are not as good or last as long or are as reliable as the Japan made version. This is not just my personal view. Tourism from China to Japan also indicate this. Thousands come to Japan and buy the same product in Japan for double the price than the ones made in China. No only Zojirushi, but Toto, Sharp, Toshiba, etc...
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I think the simple answer is that you can't paint everything with the same brush. Historically, Japan was known for producing high quality electronics and other manufacturing. China was not. More recently, this oversimplification has become more and more murky - to the point were such a generalization probably isn't that useful or accurate.
A piece of anecdotal evidence of my own: In 2008, I purchased a Denon audio receiver. This was the last year that midrange Denon receivers were made in Japan. At that time, there was quite a consensus that the Denon receivers still made in the Japanese factory had somewhat better quality control (just taking off the cover and looking at things like solder points and glue applications, etc, corroborated this). But I would never use this isolated experience to judge all Japanese vs Chinese made items today.
That said, it wouldn't be all that surprising if a Japanese company such as this one, that made items in both Japan and China, might have a QC edge in the native country - if for no other reason than the man reason such a company would choose to extend manufacturing into China would be to cut costs. And cutting costs often comes with quality compromises. On the other hand, with an example like the iPhone, which is exclusively made in China (to high standards) there would be absolutely no reason, obviously, to suspect quality compromises.
blahhh
Finally, a good and rational answer. However, if most of the mainland Chinese people I work with is telling me that the Chinese will go to Japan to buy products made in Japan, even though the same product is made in China by the same Japanese company, this indicates something to me. When the Japanese start doing the reverse, then I can retract my statement.
I’m kind of a rice cooker snob. Zojirushi is a top brand, but 3 cups is WAY too small, even for 2 people. A 5.5 cup is the sweet spot, enough for 2 people and leftovers, or enough to serve up to 4 or 5 people depending on the dish.
Great cooker, just wayyy too small.
poweruser86
Even my 5 Cup cooker can only handle 2-2.5 cups of brown rice (depending on cook speed) with minimal mess. 3.5-4 cups of white rice rarely resorts to scraping the top "lid".
What's the model of this cooker?
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XT is the colorway code.
You should be listing model information in the product details. Stop trying to hide information to increase sales.
Any one know what the bowl is made of? I assume steel since it's induction, but is it non-stick? I would love to get a non non-stick rice cooker.
cgarai
It is a very thick aluminum pan (with an induction core) and has a non stick coating.
A great rice cooker. Just beware that this is for small (2-3 people) batches of rice. Despite being called a 3 cup maker the instructions only recommend making up to 2* cups (lower depending on the type) and those are the traditional Japanese sized cups that are only ~6 ounces ( you use their special measurer). Therefore it is really only for making ~12 ounces despite the name suggesting 24oz
For those that care the induction model is made in Japan instead of Taiwan like the other versions.
*you can do 3 of their "cups" for white and white sushi everything else is 2
Can i use this in Sweden? do i buy another plug converter?
WillowTheMovie
The manual (pg 25) indicates this is a 120V 60Hz model only. http://www.zojirushi.com/servicesupport/manuals/manual_pdf/npgbc_05.pdf
What is the electric voltage? No information.
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jbbb
Yes, agree with you, most probably 110V, but still no official information. Hey, Massdrop, what's hard in writing down this figures everytime? This should not be an option.
I bought the 5-cup version of this cooker after using non-induction models from Zojirushi and Panasonic for 20+ years. All types of rice turn out noticeably better, and the GABA brown rice setting is nice to have. I've also noticed that cleanup after brown rice is quite a bit easier than with the conventional cookers, though I don't know why that would be. Of the appliances that I own, this is the one I would most recommend to others.
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I do eat rice almost every day, and when I commented above about ”noticeably better” results with the induction cooker I should have written “noticeably more consistent.” This is something I appreciate; it’s not so much a matter of taste as texture and degree of firmness. For those who eat rice only occasionally I suppose this cooker might be overkill.
IH shortens the cooking time and is more efficient in electrical consumption. Worth it in spades, but you have to look at the total complement of features. The GABA Brown Rice setting is critically important once you understand the nutritional value of GABA rice.