Dec 17, 20175013 views
Every time I think That's enough watches, for a while, I'm sorely tempted with something new that defies that thought...
Yesterday this came in, A Bulova Precisionist, 42mm x 10.5mm, polished SS everything and flat Hardlex crystal.
I confess I have never been a fan of quartz watches, thinking them as cheap time keepers but not really "watches". For that you needed 100-250 parts lovingly and carefully assembled by craftsmen/artisans and fine tuned to run within 5-15 seconds per day.
I've changed my mind (it's never too late:), quartz too can be real watches. I had recently bought two Aragons that used the Seiko V series which beats four times per second, unlike the 1 second clunk of most quartzes. They run very well and are exceedingly accurate. Well, along comes the Bulova. The second hand has a mesmerizing non-stop sweep. The build, fit and finish reek of quality. I'm so glad such fine watches are still being made in this country. I will get another one for sure. They list for $400-450 but with the sales days upon us they can be had for half of that if you look around.

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Have a fine weekend and Watch our for that slippery slope... (-:
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Danbo_de_Piano, Vincent.H, and 8 others
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Forgotten advertising copy: "With a Bulova you can trust that your crystal won't pop off, even on the moon."
===== From Wikipedia:
In the 1960s, [Bulova] was involved in a notable Space Age rivalry with Omega Watches to be selected as the 'first watch on the moon'. In 1971, a Bulova chronograph was carried on board Apollo 15 – the fourth mission to land men on the moon — by mission commander David Scott. All twelve men who walked on the moon wore standard Omega Speedmaster watches that had been officially issued by NASA. Those watches are deemed to be government property. However, transcripts from the Apollo 15 Lunar Surface Journal attest to the fact that during Scott’s second excursion to the moon’s surface, the crystal on his Official Omega watch had popped off. So, during his third lunar walk, he used his backup Bulova watch.
The Bulova Chronograph Model #88510/01 that Scott wore on the lunar surface was expected to fetch more than $1 million, as it is the only privately owned watch to have walked the lunar surface. There are images of him wearing this watch, when he saluted the American flag on the moon, with the Hadley Delta expanse in the background. That Apollo 15 third excursion lasted 4 hours, 49 minutes and 50 seconds. The watch shows “significant wear from exposure while on the moon, and from splashdown and recovery.”The watch sold for US $1.625 million, which makes it the most expensive astronaut-owned artifact ever sold at auction.
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I wonder how much that Omega crystal will get at auction when the Chinese or the Indians discover it on the moon in 30 years.
Cloaca
Nice story, had never heard it. Thanks!
That my friend is a very nice watch..... I’ve been a fan of the precisionist line for some time. Just a really robust, accurate watch
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RGM Watches in Lancaster, PA. Little different price point though (much higher than Weiss, but most are bespoke watches) http://www.rgmwatches.com/watches/
American 801SW movement with center second hand.  Like many things that we do at RGM, the 801SW is inspired by America's great watchmaking past.  The bridges are reminiscent of the Keystone Howard Watch Company's "Edward Howard" model, their flagship watch and one of the high grade watches of its time.  The unique winding click is inspired by the Illinois Watch Company's "Illini" model and the deep polished winding wheels are finished like those of the Illinois "Bunn Special".  Like the great Railroad watches from America's past, the 801SW has a high grade finish that denotes the quality of its construction.  Most center second movements have a wheel friction fit onto a pivot from the third wheel coming thru the bridge. To service the watch this wheel must be pulled off and pressed back on.  The 801SW movement has the third wheel and the sweep drive wheel on the third wheel arbor, this double wheel is under the bridge eliminating the friction wheel system. This system requires more parts but it is a much better construction.
dasman
I was fortunate to attend the RGM 25th anniversary event in September. Really great stuff and it was a pleasure to try on some truly remarkable watches. The Caliber 20 was definitely my favorite.
Gorgeous watch. A precisionist has been on my list for a while but I haven't pulled the trigger. You have one of the best versions, and it's tempting me again. I do love that smooth sweep, perhaps more smooth than the GS spring drive.
PetrosD
Thanks Petros. I would heartily recommend, this is the first time I've seen one and I'm impressed. The sweep is amazing, and it's handy to have a watch that you can set all others to. The bracelet is very nice quality as well. They are huge, needed to remove 4 links and a half link, so your large wrist will be accommodated.
I think if I were going to stray from automatics I would just go to a radio-controlled/wave ceptor style watch that will be perfectly accurate until the electromagnetic pulse nuclear war or the planet-killing mega sun spot happens. At that point I will rely on a Nomos ... sundial, that is.

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https://www.nomos-store.com/en/Things/Sundials/Sundial-stainless-steel-Local-time-Glashuette.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyggAJJuN_I
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A smartphone does use atomic time, but the time on my smartphone doesn't show seconds, so I use the app to get seconds when my watch will hack (I have two watches that don't). The Watchville app also shows the correct moon phase, for people who need to set that complication. Technically speaking, a smartphone gets the time from the network it's on, and the networks are the ones that sync with atomic time on the back end.
PetrosD
I think you really want UTC instead of atomic time (TAI). They are not the same, and UTC is the official time in all but certain scientific realms. UTC is based on the day length, ultimately, which is ever so slightly shorter as time goes on and earth spins down to its icy death (or the sun expands to engulf it, or explodes in a supernova, or whatever will happen at the end). Atomic time was arbitrarily set to the length of the day in 1958 and never changes, so it gets more and more out of sync with reality, about 37 seconds off now.
At any rate, all these websites, apps, phones, and radio transmitters have network latency that the software tries to estimate and correct for, but nothing is showing exact time, atomic or otherwise, although all of them are accurate enough for setting a second hand.