Conklin Mark Twain 14K Flex Nib Crescent Fillersearch

Conklin Mark Twain 14K Flex Nib Crescent Filler

Conklin Mark Twain 14K Flex Nib Crescent Filler

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I have the same question as another user below. My nib does not write. Why? There is a visible gap between the tines. Ergo, no capillary flow. I like the pen, so I don’t want a return, but I don’t know what nib service is available. Right now, it is a pretty (expensive) piece of plastic.
For those who is keen on the writing sample. Pardon me for my handwriting and paper quality. Ink flow was good and wet. Medium Nib write like a Board.
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So my Conklin pen came in today. nice looking pen, very flexible nib. I inked it per instructions and......nothing. Ink will not flow. If you continuously draw figure 8's, you'll get a little ink, but it stops as soon as you stop writing....and doesn't start again for a few letters. I emailed the info@conklin.com and got a return email that the address is not valid. I tried submitting a problem request at their website, but that kept erroring out also. I'm not happy that this pen doesn't flow at all.
gartland291
ok, I tried two different types of ink. Lamy black and Noodler's black. Neither ink will flow. Really frustrated that a $200 pen can't even get ink flow right.
Guess I got really lucky. Blue one in Fine Nib coming my way.
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I just verified my receipt. Blue with gold accent - Fine Nib. Huh... Guess we'll just have to wait and see. it's not going to be my EDC pen since I usually like pens with a lot higher quality. I was just intrigued by it.
gartland291
I did the same thing! Hopefully there are no issues.
Why is checkout still available if all pens are sold out?
Well, I see I was a bit late in making my decision, but I had absolutely no idea that only 13 pens would be offered. IMHO, that's rather a low blow. I have a Conklin Mark Twain, but it's the conventional model, steel nib, etc., but it's a great pen, and I'm sure I love mine as much as Mark Twain did his. The thought of having another one was certainly tantalizing, but I guess it was not to be. Sigh.
I see the same thing. Only 13 pens sold. Though I did debate on this. Most pens now a days mention "flex" to mean springiness not large line width variation in writing which is what people really want... along with smoothness and ease of use etc.. A writing sample of the "flex" would be nice.
Everything is sold out? You had just 13 pens in total?
soleson
Looks like it...bummer. Almost certainly the last few...SMALL runs of these colors. Plus, these have gold nibs, not steel.
Writing reviews can be found on FPN. Seems "flexible" is an overstatement, which isn't surprising. The review is specifically for the Ambrosia, but that was another LE run of 98 and described as a flexible nib...so, highly likely to me to use the same nib and feed.
Please post a picture of a writing sample showing the flex of the nib. Vintage Conklin pens could flex easily from XF to BBBB widths allowing for very expressive and ornamental writing. I doubt that this pen can do this, but what exactly can it do? Don't misunderstand, if it could do what Conklin pens used to do, it would be fantastic. Expressive writing with a very flexible nib is a skill worthy of learning, especially when eMail threatens the use of postal letters and handwriting in general.
Best regards,
David
It is just wrong to say that "this is an exact replica of the 1897 design." Granted that it uses the crescent filling system, but replica...No.