LifeStraw Flex Multi-Use Water Filtersearch

LifeStraw Flex Multi-Use Water Filter

LifeStraw Flex Multi-Use Water Filter

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I can't comment on this LifeStraw specifically, but I've used their two primary products (the filter only and also the bottles) and love them. I took the bottle with me to Costa Rica and Panama and drank straight out of the rivers there and did not get sick at all. No they won't filter chemicals, but I'm not really aware of any portable filtration devices that will unless you are willing to carry a complete reverse osmosis or distillation kit with you. You can try activated charcoal (in the form of GACs) but I'm not sure how effective they will be without a full system.
Hydration bladder adapters included?
KTooTall
No, from what I can tell based on a response to a comment on another site, this may or may not connect with what's included. Any adapters would need to be purchased separately depending on the hydration bladder. IDK how accurate that is, though!
Does this filter lead and other heavy metals?
BPGZ
No. Not many portable filters do. Always check their websites.
No answers and few sales...I'm certain there's no correlation.
Does this come with the quick-connectors? If it does I'm a buyer, if not I'll stick with Sawyer or try Katadyn instead.
Copy/pasting my review from REI/amazon for others:
" I almost never write product reviews but I feel this one deserves it. Not sure what the negative reviews are about. I had no issue with flow or leaks. You do have to screw it onto the bottle pretty tight and make sure the gasket is clean. Flow was only slightly slower compared to a sawyer squeeze (oh whoop dee doo you spend an extra 5 seconds squeezing a bottle, are you really that stretched for time while hiking?). Compared to its main competitor the sawyer squeeze (which I also own) here are my findings.
Pros: -includes a bottle you can use to drink from -includes a optional/removable activated carbon cartridge -same weight as its competitor -screws onto standard water bottles -screws onto wide water bottles (nalgene) -has a drinking cap to keep it clean -bottle shrinks as you drink from it to take up less space. You can easily store it in a pocket.
Cons: -carbon catridge has a fairly limited lifespan (100L, so about 2 months of regular daily use on something like the AT), it costs $12 to replace (1/3 the cost of the unit itself) -soft plastic bottles are pricier to replace -soft plastic bottles are less durable -soft plastic bottles don't hold their shape which limits placement and means you can't for example stand it up on a table -slightly slower flow (if you suck through it and squeeze the bottle at the same time you'll get very good flow though) Carbon filters allow this to remove common chemical contaminants in addition to the physical contaminants (dirt and microbes) that the hollow fiber membrane removes. This is important if you want to use it overseas or near agricultural or industrial sectors. I have looked far and wide and this is the only backpacking filter with one, period. It also removes any foul odors and tastes from water. Which I find useful for allowing me to drink water in the backcountry from stagnant sources that would otherwise make me want to puke from the smell/taste or tap water that has too much chlorination or sulfur in it. Seriously why do all larger water filters use carbon but not backpacking filters? "
This is a horrible product. The bag leaks horribly and i've never been able to use it. The flow rate is less than the sawyer mini (with the carbon element removed) and it can leak from where the filter ends screw on. I only say this to save others from filter failure on trail.
What is the size/weight of the included bottle?