Snow Peak GeoShield Stovesearch

Snow Peak GeoShield Stove

Snow Peak GeoShield Stove

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For those who may be interested, a review of the Snow Peak GeoShield stove: https://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2016/12/review-snow-peak-geoshield-remote.html
After playing with my GeoShield a few times, I noticed that the stove is set up wrong in the photos here on Mass Drop. The photographer must not have had a copy of the instructions and just winged it. The pot supports should be fully rotated into place at 120 degree angles to one another. Two of the pot supports should be on either side of the gap through which the fuel hose passes. The cable that holds the windscreen together should be pulled tight like a drawcord and then wrapped around the little cleat. Now, maybe this stove is a bigger stove than most people would buy or whatever, but one thing is for sure that the engineering is well done and up to Japanese standards (i.e. high standards). Once you get the GeoShield set up, it's really solid and really stable.
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Attached is a photo of my GeoShield. Notice how the pot supports connect, one on either side of the opening in the windscreen. Notice also how the windscreen is tight and solidly attached to the stove and heat reflector. You could also take a look at the video from Snow Peak to see how the stove should really be set up.
HJ
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hikin_jim
Our stove set up is indeed incorrect. We'll look to reshoot these if we decide to rerun in the future. Thanks for sharing your photos!
ChristineLim
Hi, @ChristineLim, it happens. I just wanted people to know that the design is good from an engineering and manufacturing stand point. If one is in the market for this class of stove, this is not a bad choice.
HJ
Just for grins, I tried setting up the Geo Shield that I have. It took me 40 seconds to set everything up. Clearly that's longer than set up on just a regular upright canister stove, but way faster than with a white gas stove. Really, it's not that bad in terms of "fiddle factor."
@utopik
The Soto Windmaster is one of my favorite stoves. What did I take on my JMT trip this past summer? A Windmaster. It's the lightest upright canister stove with a piezoelectric ignition that I am aware of and in my opinion the best of its class.
That said, the Geo is a different class of stove: A) The Geo is going to be a far more stable platform on which to cook, particularly with large pots, and yes I am aware of the Four Flex alternate pot support for the WindMaster. B) The Geo will have about a 20 Fahrenheit degree cold weather advantage over upright type stoves because one can run with the canister upside down which prevents the diminishment of that fraction of the fuel that is propane. C) The Geo can be completely surrounded by a windscreen without the danger of overheating the canister because the fuel is outside the windscreen and is fed in via the hose. Try a 100% coverage windscreen on an upright canister stove and it might just be your last hike. Ever. This added windproofness cannot be matched by the WindMaster, and yes I am aware of the WindMaster's considerable capability in wind. The Geo is still capable of more. Note the use of the word "capable". You would have to augment the stock windscreen.
Now, does that mean the Geo is the better stove? Well, not really. They're just different classes of stove. If you don't need the wide cooking surface of the Geo, the added wind proofness, or the winter capability, you'd most likely be better served by the WindMaster.
HJ
I'm loving my Soto Windmaster OD-1RX. It weighs 1/4(100g) compared to this, has a built in igniter and doesn't even need a windscreen. Its Micro Regulator for the flame control is the best I've seen on any stove so far. I've used a stove with the regulator on the canister side, like this one, and the response time lag was annoying. Although I'm unsure if this one would perform the same way I ever since prefer the stoves with the regulator on the stove itself. Windmaster is currently $60 after 20% off at campsaver though I got it for $33.74 during some ridiculous special on this in June.
You can choose a chinese stove of this style for about 1/6 the price at amazon. Windscreen is a little more. Piezo is built in. I have one, and they are so simple not much can go wrong. I used to have the MSR whisperlite and gave it up for one of those. After a season's use, can't see the need to spend up for one like this.
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deejayoh63
That looks like an FMS-117t from Fire Maple, but I suspect it's a knock off. Not sure.
If it is a real Fire Maple made stove, then it's one of the Chinese manufactured stoves with a good reputation. NOTE HOWEVER that this particular stove by its design CANNOT support winter mode.
HJ
deejayoh63
@deejayoh63 I checked, and that stove on Amazon isn't a real FMS-117t. It may be fine, but it is in fact a knock off.
http://www.fire-maple.com/en/productsinfo.aspx?pid=8
HJ
The perhaps bad news here is that it doesn't do well with small pots. This is a set up for larger pots. I tried it with a 550 ml pot, and a lot of the heat went up the sides and was wasted. The burner head is fairly wide -- which gourmet cooks will love inasmuch as it avoids hot spotting -- but ill suited for narrow pots. Maybe a 1 liter pot of "traditional" proportions (i.e. wider than it is tall) would be a good fit, and then pots up to maybe 5 or 6 liters. That's your range I would think. Tall, narrow pots? Get yourself a different stove.
HJ
Now, as for the "fiddle factor," I'll have to time myself with it. Setting up the windscreen isn't *that* bad. You just pull the cables tight and wind the excess cable around the little davit. You then have to attach the heat reflector and mount the stove on to the top of the windscreen. It is a bit of fiddle, I will grant you that. Horrible? Hmm. Well, I've used a lot of white gas stoves where you have to pump and prime, so this doesn't stymie me, but if you're used to a typical upright canister stove where you just screw it on top of a canister and pop the piezo, then yes this is going to seem like a lot of fiddling around.
One nice aspect of this stove is that they really did a good job of making it compact for what it is. Everything folds up and packs up pretty small. Not as small as a, say a Snow Peak Gigapower (to compare it to the classic of the Snow Peak line of stoves), but not bad for what it is.
HJ
It is heavy compared to many stoves. What you get is a very large, very stable cooking surface. This would be a good stove for those using large pots, say for groups or for melting snow (where you need a lot of volume). It would also be good for large pans, perhaps even a griddle.
I would see this as a stove for groups, for base camps, or perhaps for trailhead camping where you want a stove that is compatible with the same fuel you'll use on your trip, but you want to have a nice gourmet (or at least better than backpacking food) kind of meal. Use the uber small UL stove for the trail and this for your last "real" meal (until you get back).
Also to be noted is that this is capable of handling an inverted canister, i.e. with the gas canister upside down with the fuel going down the fuel line as a liquid. Operating with the canister inverted gives one a (all else being equal) 20 degree cold weather advantage over "upright" type canister stoves.
HJ
Interesting concept, will have to read up on this. Not sure it would beat my Spider and a regular windscreen though.
As an aside, I think MD deserves praise for a very thorough presentation of this item. Size, weight, pictures - all there. Well done. :-)
Seems like a lot of pieces to manage and keep track of.