EarFirst T23 High-Fidelity Earplugssearch

EarFirst T23 High-Fidelity Earplugs

EarFirst T23 High-Fidelity Earplugs

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(23 reviews)
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how do i connect the cable????
Kamani
Mmcx connector at the end, but you have to buy your own.
so what is a good "pro sumer" grade earplug? comfort over audiophilia.
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Why are you even defending your comment? People need to use ear protection and there are a lot of good reasons to use it. OP, personally I would recommend Westone WR20 or Etymotic ER20.
treal512
Because people think earplugs like these are actually useful. Both the earplugs you recommended have a NRR of less then 20, with a rating of 20 you get a total decible reduction of 6 (NRR rating minus 7 then divided by 2) which means these give you an extra 15 minutes of safe listening at a loud concert (120 decible) which brings your safe listening time up to a total of 30 minutes. Also I did it to entertain myself because people took the joke seriously and ignored the point that loud concert speakers are balanced like crap and using balanced earplugs so you can hear crap balance anyway is pointless, big concerts aren't about the quality of the sounds it's about the experience of listening to the music you enjoy performed by people you like, with a pile of other people there to do the same.
Every earplug sold in the U.S. is required by law to have a Noise Reduction Rating (NRR) published for it and also the data used for calculating the NRR - the mean Real-Ear Attenuation at Threshold values and the standard deviations of the attenuation values for the one-third octave bands of noise centered at 125, 250 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, an 8000 Hz for a group of ten listeners as measured in accordance with ANSI S3.19 Experimenter Fit Procedure. That applies regardless of whether the earplug is intended for the occupational, recreational, or home environment. There is no legal way to have an earplug designed to reduce noise for any application that is free from this requirement. So, where are the data for this earplug?
SoundDoc
Unsurprisingly, you can't find a website for EarFirst. I did find a list of the attenuation ranges on the Amazon listing for it.
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Hi, do anybody know of the block/decrease the sound of industrial machines with the same level of sound like an angel grinder for example?
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igtl314
grinding angels is a surefire path to hell.
Calaverasgrande
or heaven, depends on where you stand.
These are relatively flat up to 1kHz, but above 1kHz, the rolloff is substantial. ~20dB reduction under 1kHz, up to 32dB reduction at 2kHz - 4kHz. These will definitely provide an appreciable level of protection in a situation where you’re not concerned about acute hearing damage (anywhere where most people are not wearing hearing protection), but these cannot compete with higher-end high-fidelity/flat in-ear hearing protection plugs and they are about 50-75x more expensive than foam disposables that will be more effective and only slightly less flat. For $18, you can’t go too wrong, but don’t expect these to keep up with a professional product or blow away expectations compared to a disposable.
MiraCole
Do you know any good higher-end brands?
MiraCole
Human hearing is subject to the Fletcher-Munson loudness curve. Our hearing is most sensitive in the range from 2khz to 4khz. And falls off rapidly moving toward the lower frequencies. In order for you to hear flat with earplugs. You actually want an earplug with less attenuation of high and low, more attenuation of midrange.
Out of all the earplugs I've used on my motorcycle– with and without a muffler attached– these block out noise the best without completely shutting out the street, and they are the easiest to get a good seal.
A sucker is born every minute
Ordered sets for my parents. Will see how they like them.
I have a question, wearing this in concerts will improve the perceivable audio quality? usually in small metal gigs what you hear is a mess compared to the actual audio file, will a pair of good engineered earplugs fix or mitigate that issue?
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DI the guitar? I'm guessing you haven't done much metal.
Calaverasgrande
A line out from the amp and/or in line before it. I guess you've never had a guitarist or bassist blow a cone on their stack, cook their amp, or both. It's a simple thing to shift to the line input with processing to emulate their rig (if needed). If you're lucky you have the room in their monitor to keep them happy. - It also allows you (with a BIG rig in a big venue) to let them get stupid loud and not have to worry about them clipping the mic signal, but still reinforce them. I had a metal group a few decades back who supplied 4 different guitar DI feeds because it let them do some $%^&*ing weird processor fades in the FOH mix. (They brought their own FOH guy). Drummer also had a bigger Gibraltar rack than I've ever seen, including in show rooms. They were a hoot. Simple loudness isn't an issue (although it can be). One of the best gigs I ever worked was over 112 dB at the FOH mix position about 40 yards from the stage, and it sounded outstanding. The stage topped 130 at points, I'm honestly not certain how the performers were still able to hear at all after the gig. I'm not sure what the FOH stacks were at, but I was sent up with aviation muffs on to try to figure out which box was failing, and I'm still not sure how to describe the feeling.
Oh, right, Trolls and people who don't know anything about what these are for. So it's ignorance or stupidity that makes people say stupid S**t. LOL
Ah trolls. The waste of air of our society.
So let me get this straight--77 people bought these for $18 a pop and the db reduction rating of -23? And maybe you can sleep with them? Here's some free advice, I've been sleeping EVERY night with earplugs (sometimes in extremity noisy places--and not by choice), for the past five years, and -23db is a very marginal improvement over nothing. I would pay ten times the price for something *appreciably* better, that I actually could sleep with, but I haven't found it yet. What I have found are dirt-cheap -30db foam plugs that do a very good job, and I absolutely can sleep in them. I get them at Walmart for for about nine-bucks per 50 count. You should too: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mack-s-Dreamgirl-NRR-30-dB-Soft-Foam-Earplugs-50-count/17034310?action=product_interest&action_type=title&beacon_version=1.0.2&bucket_id=irsbucketdefault&client_guid=5ae438cd-db06-4dbd-3ab9-cda6c1383147&config_id=2&customer_id_enc&findingMethod=p13n&guid=5ae438cd-db06-4dbd-3ab9-cda6c1383147&item_id=17034310&parent_anchor_item_id=10318441&parent_item_id=10318441&placement_id=irs-2-b1&reporter=recommendations&source=new_site&strategy=PWVAV&visitor_id=XFI07ehpUvd-FyXQotl1SI
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My apologies if that's the case, although by the insults you were dishing out earlier I find it hard to believe you would find the way I addressed your comments offensive. However, I did in no way mean to hurt any feelings and I simply wanted to have a debate over the validity of this product. On that note, what are your thoughts on what I said? Beyond the offensive part of course.
jpkeb
I was kidding—I’m not not particularly sensitive and you didn’t hurt my feelings. Your comments were quite good and have completely changed my thinking on the subject —and on the meaning of life in general. Many thanks!
Are these comfortable to wear overnight?
Sleeping in the city is noisy..
pLaStiKMaN
For sleep you might want to try the collapsible foam plugs you can get at a drugstore. The ones in the drop are made more for safe listening in loud situations.
So many claim X dB. But what’s the actual NRR (knowing that that has its own issues, at least it gives a common standard number of dB isolation)?
Will theses sleeves fit the Noble X ?
bertrol1
these aren't sleeves for IEMs; they're earplugs.
bertrol1
Thanks I am just getting into this and learning. But I have certainly rediscovered my music.
For those too lazy to google, the Amazon page does have a frequency response table in the product images. Looks like it has a lot more attenuation above 2Khz, which is not surprising. Not truly flat, not sure how they compare to normal foam earplugs either. They're $20 on amazon.
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2 times reusing DISPOSABLE ear plugs is gross. If you use a lot of ear plugs, buy a large contractor pack (also marketed to shooting ranges.) and throw them out. Ewe. Lol. After that first time they get lint and all sorts of other $hit stuck to them.
DrewDel
Depends on the brand and how waxy your ears are. I reuse disposable plugs for 4 or 5 days, but only wear them for 5 minutes at a time.
Yeah, I have to see a bona fide FR graph before I'd even consider these.
Are you for real??? $17.99 for a pair plug-in or earplugs, Whatever you people want to call it. This is really BS. It's just a better piece of rubber. I guest we are all millionaire. hahahahaha
Finally, earplugs for audiophiles. Now I don't have to hear how fucking stupid I sound when I use the word audiophile.
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I mean, there are plenty of those out there. I certainly wouldn't mind a drop for a Nacre Quietpro or similar device.
Especially in camo!
Just get Etymotic plugs
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I had that too, luckily Etymotic also has foam tips you can put on their plugs which increased the confort dramatically
FrostyP
No joke, I’ve been living in my Etymotics because of construction out on my test floor at work.
18 dollars for earplugs is a meme.
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Uzuzu
This is the 'audiophile' community. Every piece of audio equipment down to the smallest detail is overpriced. Get used to it lol
Gudedomo
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Don't really understand how these are claiming to be high-fidelity earplugs when they don't even include a frequency response test of their product.
Savagelife
I don't really understand why someone would take the time to whine when they could easily google the answer. (I do understand, though.)
Any reviews ? :)